steadyaku47

Monday, 2 January 2017

The Good Life Gone Wrong.


steadyaku47 comment : Good read - exotic lifestyle fuelled by drug dealings over....maybe this may put some sense into those dealing with the other drug... "dedak" - for the giver and the taker beware!

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A Sydney business personality who lived a lavish lifestyle of exotic beach stays, designer suits and private helicopter rides with his glamorous girlfriend is facing life in prison for his alleged role in a major drug-import syndicate.
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Darren Mohr flashed his untold wealth on social media, posing in front of his Rolls Royce and on his yacht and blatantly showing his luxury watches while his girlfriend Krissy Marsh beamed by his side.
The 42-year-old former Bondi café owner has now been arrested along with 14 other men accused of trying to import the largest collective haul of drugs seized in Australian law enforcement history.
The couple fly on a helicopter joyride. Source: Facebook
Daniel Mohr and Krissy Marsh. Source: Instagram
15 people have been arrested in relation to the drugs ring. Source: AFP

Authorities will allege a gang of 15 men used fishing trawlers in a bid to move cocaine from South America to Australia.
Mr Mohr was among those arrested, with photos showing him sitting in the gutter surrounded by a throng of police with his large, tattooed arms wearing shackles instead of a preferred luxury watch.
PLAY VIDEO 0:13

RAW: POLICE SWOOP ON ALLEGED DRUG SYNDICATE

VIDEO Police arrested 15 men on Christmas Day and Boxing Day allegedly part of drug syndicate that tried to import 1.1 tonnes of cocaine from Chile to Australia. Source: NSW Police
The happy couple could be slipt as Mr Mohr faces life in prison. Source: Facebook
It was stark contrast the to the man often photographed with girlfriend who he had known for eight years but started dating nine months ago.
In one recent post showing the laughing couple aboard a yacht, the mother-of-two boasted that "2017 is going to be so much fun".
Mr Mohr enjoys some sun. Source:
Mr Mohr and Ms Marsh pose in happier times. Source: Facebook
"You are my king," Ms Marsh wrote.
Other photos showed the couple living it up with their wrists glittered with luxury watches the Daily Mail reports to be worth tens of thousands of dollars.
Mr Mohr and his fitness model girlfriend of nine months. Source: Facebook
Ms Marsh sporting some lingerie. Source: Facebook
Mr Mohr posses with a dog. Source: Instagram
"All the cars bikes and boats mean nothing unless you got someone along for the ride. Always by my side," Mr Mohr wrote in one loving note to his girlfriend.
When police pounced on Mr Mohr, they searched his yacht moored in Sydney Harbour but nothing was said to be found.
Members of the alleged ring were swept up in a string of Christmas and Boxing Day raids, the culmination of a complex two-and-a-half-year investigation into suspected drug trafficking by commercial fishermen allegedly run out of the Sydney Fish Markets.
Police surround Mr Mohr. Source: AFP
Mr Mohr's boat searched while moored in Sydney Harbour. Source: AFP
Mr Mohr's luxury yacht. Source: AFP
Detectives pounced on a handful of the accused smugglers on Christmas night, seizing about 500 kilograms of cocaine from a boat as it pulled up to a ramp on the NSW Central Coast.
It will be alleged the group tried to import another 600 kilograms of cocaine into Australia, but the shipment was intercepted off the coast of Tahiti in March.

The combined cocaine seizures, worth around $360 million on the street, were the largest in the country's law enforcement history, Australian Federal Police Acting Assistant Commissioner Chris Sheehan said on Thursday.
Mr Mohr on a yacht. Source: Facebook
Mr Mohr looking classy. Source: Instagram
Mr Mohr and Ms Marsh live it up in the Rolls Royce. Source: Facebook
Mr Sheehan said the taskforce was "confident we have gone from the top to the bottom".
"It has taken them completely out of business," he said.
"We have ongoing enquiries, particularly in South America and other parts of the world, to look at who they were dealing with."